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A bowl of spicy beef rice noodles atop a bamboo mat with wooden spoon, fork and chopsticks.
Beef mifen from Mifen Prince in Plano.
Mifen Prince

15 Essential Chinese Restaurants in DFW

Noodles, dimsum, hotpot, skewers, Peking duck, clay pot rice and hearty soups await

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Beef mifen from Mifen Prince in Plano.
| Mifen Prince

Over the past five years, the Metroplex’s Chinese restaurant scene has exploded in a colorful fireworks display of Chinese American favorites, Cantonese, Szechuan and more delicacies. Chinatown in Richardson continues to thrive. A second Chinatown is blossoming in a strip mall on Coit and Park in Plano — with more exciting restaurants popping up further north.

Add some of these spots to your to-eat list to try the regional styles and specific Chinese food delicacies that are fascinating to diners in DFW.

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Haidilao Hot Pot

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This hot pot chain specializes in Sichuan-style hot pots, but only some of the broths are spicy and hot. Check its hot pot 101 guide for assistance and choose from the broths — as many as four — dipping sauces, proteins, vegetables and starches to go with this cook-as-you-eat experience.  

Dumpling House

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Love dumplings? Order a platter or two at Dumpling House. They come in savory and sweet. For those who can’t get enough, take home a bag of 25 pieces of frozen handmade dumplings to eat fresh whenever a craving strikes. 

Uncle Zhou

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Uncle Zhou in Plano showcases traditional Henan cuisine from central China and is known for its in-house noodles. The deceptive simplicity of its “dial oil” hand-drawn wide noodle showcases the kitchen’s noodle-making mastery. Other notable dishes include baked noodles (also made in-house), fish in a sweet and sour sauce, and dragon eggplant. 

B2J Suancai Fish

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Order the Szechuan specialty, Suan Cai Yu — a spicy, sour fish and pickled mustard greens soup. The soup comes in original flavor, spicy, or spicy and numbing. The add-ons include tofu, mushrooms, or noodles. It is a perfect warm-up dish for the colder months, and diners can choose the serving size according to the number of people. 

East Wall Chinese Cuisine

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This spot serves Chinese American favorites and Cantonese specialties. Dine in to try the Hong Kong-style clay pot rice, which requires a 20 to 30-minute wait. It is topped with a choice of roast barbecue, chicken and mushroom, or pork rib, then drizzled with a sweet soy-based sauce. The crown jewel is the crispy and golden layer of rice at the bottom.  

Hunan Bistro

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A number of the regional dishes from the central province of Hunan at this restaurant look similar to their Sichuan counterparts and pack the heat from chili without the mouth-numbing sensation of Sichuan peppercorns. The “Unforgettable combo of lamb and fish filet” is one of the menu’s most tempting orders, thanks to that unforgettable name.

Chen’s Restaurant

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Traditional Sichuan dishes are what’s on offer here, including hot pot. Try ordering the toothpick lamb, barbecue pork ribs in cumin sauce, and beef in hot sour broth. 

Mifen Prince

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Rice noodles are king here. It specializes in the flavors of the Huaxi area of Guiyang, the capital of the Guizhou province. The signature beef mifen in a soup bowl comes with a spicy hot broth that has a kiss of sourness and delicate, bouncy rice noodles. Don’t miss out on the house-made yogurt or a sour plum drink to quench the fire its spicy noodle bowls are sure to start. 

Fat Ni BBQ

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Come here for northern China-style seasoned meats, seafood, proteins, and vegetables on a stick. Beef tendon skewers and the plate of lamb chops are must-orders. Don’t expect to be served rice to pair with this regional delicacy; there is none. Instead, the kitchen offers a choice of noodles, roasted skewered steamed buns, or good old ice-cold bottles of beer, as is characteristic of the wheat basket in the north.

Ten Seconds Yunnan Rice Noodles

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This spot is home to food from a southwestern province in China that serves as its namesake. A bowl of the original “crossing bridge” rice noodle soup is a must-order. It’s a hot broth served with a layer of oil to preserve its heat, with delicate rice noodles and toppings served on the side, including paper-thin slices of meat. Swish around the raw meat first to cook it, then add noodles toppings as desired. 

Bushi-bushi Dim Sum

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At this dim sum spot, the duck takes center stage. Order half or whole roast duck on the bone, or go big with Peking duck.

Kirin Court

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Reminiscent of Hong Kong dim sum houses, the expansive ballroom setup is crowded with ten-top tables for celebrating. Get outside the dim sum wheelhouse and try the #27, fried balls of mashed taro filled with pork and mushrooms encased in a nest-like shell. Reservations are highly recommended, especially during weekends and holidays. 

First Chinese B-B-Q

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Diners are welcomed into this spot by a window cabinet of hung Cantonese-style barbecue filled with glossy mahogany skinned roast ducks, amber steamed chicken, a side of crispy-skinned roast pork, and a mountain of red char siu pork loins. Order any of these to graze on with rice, alongside other Hong Kong-style favorites, including fresh shrimp wonton noodle soup and yang chow fried rice. 

Fortune House Chinese Cuisine

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Soupy steamed xiao long bao is the star of this Shanghai-style restaurant’s menu. Other stellar regional dishes include the Hong Shao Rou (red braised pork belly with bok choy) and the pan-fried pork buns. 

Royal China Restaurant

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Tucked into the massive shopping center at Preston and Royal, this North Dallas institution has a devoted crowd of regulars. Hand-pulled noodles (the chilled dan dan noodles are excellent) and xiao long bao (soup dumplings) are made in front of diners, while Chinese-American favorites like kung pao and sesame chicken get a serious upgrade. 

Haidilao Hot Pot

This hot pot chain specializes in Sichuan-style hot pots, but only some of the broths are spicy and hot. Check its hot pot 101 guide for assistance and choose from the broths — as many as four — dipping sauces, proteins, vegetables and starches to go with this cook-as-you-eat experience.  

Dumpling House

Love dumplings? Order a platter or two at Dumpling House. They come in savory and sweet. For those who can’t get enough, take home a bag of 25 pieces of frozen handmade dumplings to eat fresh whenever a craving strikes. 

Uncle Zhou

Uncle Zhou in Plano showcases traditional Henan cuisine from central China and is known for its in-house noodles. The deceptive simplicity of its “dial oil” hand-drawn wide noodle showcases the kitchen’s noodle-making mastery. Other notable dishes include baked noodles (also made in-house), fish in a sweet and sour sauce, and dragon eggplant. 

B2J Suancai Fish

Order the Szechuan specialty, Suan Cai Yu — a spicy, sour fish and pickled mustard greens soup. The soup comes in original flavor, spicy, or spicy and numbing. The add-ons include tofu, mushrooms, or noodles. It is a perfect warm-up dish for the colder months, and diners can choose the serving size according to the number of people. 

East Wall Chinese Cuisine

This spot serves Chinese American favorites and Cantonese specialties. Dine in to try the Hong Kong-style clay pot rice, which requires a 20 to 30-minute wait. It is topped with a choice of roast barbecue, chicken and mushroom, or pork rib, then drizzled with a sweet soy-based sauce. The crown jewel is the crispy and golden layer of rice at the bottom.  

Hunan Bistro

A number of the regional dishes from the central province of Hunan at this restaurant look similar to their Sichuan counterparts and pack the heat from chili without the mouth-numbing sensation of Sichuan peppercorns. The “Unforgettable combo of lamb and fish filet” is one of the menu’s most tempting orders, thanks to that unforgettable name.

Chen’s Restaurant

Traditional Sichuan dishes are what’s on offer here, including hot pot. Try ordering the toothpick lamb, barbecue pork ribs in cumin sauce, and beef in hot sour broth. 

Mifen Prince

Rice noodles are king here. It specializes in the flavors of the Huaxi area of Guiyang, the capital of the Guizhou province. The signature beef mifen in a soup bowl comes with a spicy hot broth that has a kiss of sourness and delicate, bouncy rice noodles. Don’t miss out on the house-made yogurt or a sour plum drink to quench the fire its spicy noodle bowls are sure to start. 

Fat Ni BBQ

Come here for northern China-style seasoned meats, seafood, proteins, and vegetables on a stick. Beef tendon skewers and the plate of lamb chops are must-orders. Don’t expect to be served rice to pair with this regional delicacy; there is none. Instead, the kitchen offers a choice of noodles, roasted skewered steamed buns, or good old ice-cold bottles of beer, as is characteristic of the wheat basket in the north.

Ten Seconds Yunnan Rice Noodles

This spot is home to food from a southwestern province in China that serves as its namesake. A bowl of the original “crossing bridge” rice noodle soup is a must-order. It’s a hot broth served with a layer of oil to preserve its heat, with delicate rice noodles and toppings served on the side, including paper-thin slices of meat. Swish around the raw meat first to cook it, then add noodles toppings as desired. 

Bushi-bushi Dim Sum

At this dim sum spot, the duck takes center stage. Order half or whole roast duck on the bone, or go big with Peking duck.

Kirin Court

Reminiscent of Hong Kong dim sum houses, the expansive ballroom setup is crowded with ten-top tables for celebrating. Get outside the dim sum wheelhouse and try the #27, fried balls of mashed taro filled with pork and mushrooms encased in a nest-like shell. Reservations are highly recommended, especially during weekends and holidays. 

First Chinese B-B-Q

Diners are welcomed into this spot by a window cabinet of hung Cantonese-style barbecue filled with glossy mahogany skinned roast ducks, amber steamed chicken, a side of crispy-skinned roast pork, and a mountain of red char siu pork loins. Order any of these to graze on with rice, alongside other Hong Kong-style favorites, including fresh shrimp wonton noodle soup and yang chow fried rice. 

Fortune House Chinese Cuisine

Soupy steamed xiao long bao is the star of this Shanghai-style restaurant’s menu. Other stellar regional dishes include the Hong Shao Rou (red braised pork belly with bok choy) and the pan-fried pork buns. 

Royal China Restaurant

Tucked into the massive shopping center at Preston and Royal, this North Dallas institution has a devoted crowd of regulars. Hand-pulled noodles (the chilled dan dan noodles are excellent) and xiao long bao (soup dumplings) are made in front of diners, while Chinese-American favorites like kung pao and sesame chicken get a serious upgrade. 

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