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Korean noodles served in traditional brass bowl
Kooksoo website

8 Notable Spots to Eat Cold Noodle Dishes Around Dallas

Take your pick from Japanese, Taiwanese, Korean, and Chinese cold noodle dishes

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Korean noodles served in traditional brass bowl
| Kooksoo website

Temperatures are soaring all over the Metroplex. Though ice creams and frozen drinks dominate summer, did you know that you can also enjoy cold savory noodles to cool down?

You can choose your own cold noodle adventure in Japanese, Taiwanese, Korean, and Chinese cuisine, chilled, topped with ice, or served swimming in cold soup! Check out these Dallas area restaurants that serve these noodle dishes to help you chill.

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Note: Restaurants on this map are listed geographically.

Uncle Zhou

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Acclaimed New York City transplant Uncle Zhou’s been serving Plano residents traditional Henan cuisine since 2020, and all noodles are made in-house. Of particular note are the Henan cold noodles. Thanks to their intimidating red color, this dish is associated with heat and spice — but it’s neither. It uses thinner noodles doused in a savory, sour, mildly sweet sauce with roasted peanuts and bean sprouts. 

Kooksoo

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Two kinds of traditional cold Korean noodles are on the Kooksoo menu. Instead of the wider guksu noodles used with the hot soups, a thinner variety is used for these cold dishes. The spicy bibim kooksoo is dressed in a sweet and spicy, sour chili sauce, while the kong kooksoo is in an iced soybean milk soup. 

A knot of cold wheat noodles dressed in a fiery red sweet, spicy, sour chili sauce, topped with julienned cucumber and pickled greens with a side of half a boiled egg.
Bibim kooksoo
Didi Paterno

Noodle China

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This tiny Chinese noodle shop tucked beside the Plano 99Ranch Supermarket on Spring Creek Parkway serves bowls of Sichuan-style cold noodles. The play on temperatures that finds the cold noodles tossed in a bowl of spicy and numbing oil can be perplexing at first but keeps one wanting more. Pair those noodles with equally cold appetizers, from cucumber and bamboo shoots to proteins, such as pigs ears and chicken gizzards. 

Hoja Bubble Tea and Asian Street Food

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Hoja Bubble Tea and Asian Street Food echo the energy and variety of Taiwan’s famous street food markets. In Plano, one can enjoy all these in a singular entity rather than in a collective of food carts. The Taiwanese cold noodles with creamy sesame sauce, topped with julienned vegetables and a choice of scrambled eggs or boiled chicken or ham, are hearty, rich, bright, and fresh. 

Julienned scrambled egg sheets, cucumber and carrots atop a nest of cold egg noodles with creamy sesame sauce on the side
Taiwanese cold noodles with sesame sauce
Kevin Shen | Hoja Bubble Tea and Asian Street Food website

Arirang Korean Kitchen

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This spot’s menu features three kinds of traditional cold noodle dishes: the iced-broth mul-nangmyeon and kongguksu or the broth on the side, spicy bibim-nangmyeon. Don’t forget to take home a giant bottle of their kimchi on your way out. 

Seoul Garden

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Though more known for its Korean barbecue grilled meat spread, Seoul Garden also serves mul nangmyeon (cold buckwheat noodles). The menu offers a mul nangmyeon selection for beef-loving Texans, including Galbi gui nang myeon with LA Galbi ribs on the side and bulgogi nang myeon with marinated, pan fried thin slices of beef on the side.

Marugame Udon

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Marugame Udon, the Japanese food chain started in Honolulu, specializes in its noodle namesake. With locations in Dallas and Carrollton, the “B.K. Udon” (udon noodles in broth), is served cold upon request. 

The focus and passion of Chef Teiichi Sakurai achieved equal acclaim for his handmade soba noodles, a must order at Tei-An. The zaru soba, cold soba atop a weaved plate served with a soy dipping sauce, is minimalist perfection on a summer’s day. If variety is for you, order the soba sampler with four dipping sauces: soy, black sesame, pecan, and walnut. 

Uncle Zhou

Acclaimed New York City transplant Uncle Zhou’s been serving Plano residents traditional Henan cuisine since 2020, and all noodles are made in-house. Of particular note are the Henan cold noodles. Thanks to their intimidating red color, this dish is associated with heat and spice — but it’s neither. It uses thinner noodles doused in a savory, sour, mildly sweet sauce with roasted peanuts and bean sprouts. 

Kooksoo

A knot of cold wheat noodles dressed in a fiery red sweet, spicy, sour chili sauce, topped with julienned cucumber and pickled greens with a side of half a boiled egg.
Bibim kooksoo
Didi Paterno

Two kinds of traditional cold Korean noodles are on the Kooksoo menu. Instead of the wider guksu noodles used with the hot soups, a thinner variety is used for these cold dishes. The spicy bibim kooksoo is dressed in a sweet and spicy, sour chili sauce, while the kong kooksoo is in an iced soybean milk soup. 

A knot of cold wheat noodles dressed in a fiery red sweet, spicy, sour chili sauce, topped with julienned cucumber and pickled greens with a side of half a boiled egg.
Bibim kooksoo
Didi Paterno

Noodle China

This tiny Chinese noodle shop tucked beside the Plano 99Ranch Supermarket on Spring Creek Parkway serves bowls of Sichuan-style cold noodles. The play on temperatures that finds the cold noodles tossed in a bowl of spicy and numbing oil can be perplexing at first but keeps one wanting more. Pair those noodles with equally cold appetizers, from cucumber and bamboo shoots to proteins, such as pigs ears and chicken gizzards. 

Hoja Bubble Tea and Asian Street Food

Julienned scrambled egg sheets, cucumber and carrots atop a nest of cold egg noodles with creamy sesame sauce on the side
Taiwanese cold noodles with sesame sauce
Kevin Shen | Hoja Bubble Tea and Asian Street Food website

Hoja Bubble Tea and Asian Street Food echo the energy and variety of Taiwan’s famous street food markets. In Plano, one can enjoy all these in a singular entity rather than in a collective of food carts. The Taiwanese cold noodles with creamy sesame sauce, topped with julienned vegetables and a choice of scrambled eggs or boiled chicken or ham, are hearty, rich, bright, and fresh. 

Julienned scrambled egg sheets, cucumber and carrots atop a nest of cold egg noodles with creamy sesame sauce on the side
Taiwanese cold noodles with sesame sauce
Kevin Shen | Hoja Bubble Tea and Asian Street Food website

Arirang Korean Kitchen

This spot’s menu features three kinds of traditional cold noodle dishes: the iced-broth mul-nangmyeon and kongguksu or the broth on the side, spicy bibim-nangmyeon. Don’t forget to take home a giant bottle of their kimchi on your way out. 

Seoul Garden

Though more known for its Korean barbecue grilled meat spread, Seoul Garden also serves mul nangmyeon (cold buckwheat noodles). The menu offers a mul nangmyeon selection for beef-loving Texans, including Galbi gui nang myeon with LA Galbi ribs on the side and bulgogi nang myeon with marinated, pan fried thin slices of beef on the side.

Marugame Udon

Marugame Udon, the Japanese food chain started in Honolulu, specializes in its noodle namesake. With locations in Dallas and Carrollton, the “B.K. Udon” (udon noodles in broth), is served cold upon request. 

Tei-An

The focus and passion of Chef Teiichi Sakurai achieved equal acclaim for his handmade soba noodles, a must order at Tei-An. The zaru soba, cold soba atop a weaved plate served with a soy dipping sauce, is minimalist perfection on a summer’s day. If variety is for you, order the soba sampler with four dipping sauces: soy, black sesame, pecan, and walnut. 

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