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A big red pleather circular corner booth at Sfuzzi with open windows and red velvet curtains around it. On the round table is a sampling of platters.
The corner booth and a sampling of the dishes at Sfuzzi on Henderson.
Kathy Tran

16 Essential DFW Italian Restaurants

From old-school red sauce joints to sleek newcomers, these Italian eateries have it all

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The corner booth and a sampling of the dishes at Sfuzzi on Henderson.
| Kathy Tran

There’s nothing more comforting than enjoying a giant bowl of pasta paired with red wine. A slew of new Italian places have opened in the city over the past year, and there are still plenty of old school spots to satisfy a craving for pasta lacquered in red sauce, towering lasagna, and so much more.

At each of these 16 essential Dallas Italian restaurants, a variety of cuisines and price points await. Go forth, and eat as much lasagna as humanly possible.

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PaneVino Osteria

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Tucked into an Addison strip mall, PaneVino Osteria is a welcome respite from the nearby glut of restaurant chains. In its unpretentious space, find excellent wines, scratch-made rigatoni in spicy pork ragu, and lobster fra diavolo over fettuccini.

View this post on Instagram

cute little wine haven.

A post shared by emily | 27 | dallas, tx. (@emilyblasik) on

Kenny's Italian Kitchen

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Get the feel of Little Italy in Dallas. In addition to the ice cold Grey Goose vodka on tap, this Addison Italian eatery entices diners with delicious and reasonably-priced baked ziti, chicken marsala, linguini with clams, and more.

Roman Cucina

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No-frills Italian fare is the name of the game at this North Dallas favorite, where a plate of chicken parmigiana is priced at than less than $15. Feeling like a little splurge? Consider the langostino a fuoco, or lobster in a spicy tomato-cream sauce.

Adelmo's Ristorante

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For over 25 years and through two moves, Adelmo’s has been serving classic Italian food to in-the-know Dallasites. Nightly specials, a rotating wine list, and now in a location at Lovers Lane with a lovely patio — there is always a reason to come back.

Antipasti at Adelmo’s Ristaurante
via Adelmos.com

Campisi's

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With all the new Italian spots opening up, don’t forget to revisit this Dallas dining icon that has been serving Italian fare since 1946. Hit the original location on Mockingbird Lane for cheese-topped garlic bread, shrimp scampi, and homemade ravioli in red sauce.

Taverna

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Restaurateur Alberto Lombardi opened the first outpost of this now-chain risotteria in Dallas, where it’s remained a Knox-Henderson favorite ever since. Risotto is, of course, an excellent option here, get the bowl topped with burrata and crispy prosciutto. There’s also a long list of gluten-free options.

Terilli's

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Part of Dallas’s dining landscape since 1985, Terilli’s was forced to relocate from its original home after a devastating 2010 fire. The restaurant rose from the ashes in 2012, and has since served its classic Caesar salad and shrimp scampi to hordes of adoring diners.

The first restaurant of chef Julian Barsotti’s dining empire, Nonna has served some of Highland Park’s finest Italian fare since 2006. Stunning entrees like white clam pizza, tortellini di ricotta, and Gulf red snapper with roasted squash, chickpeas, and salsa verde.

Carbone's

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A Dallas favorite since it opened, the original Carbone’s is the spot for freshly-made pasta tossed in Sunday gravy, veal parmigiana, and spaghetti with meatballs. Finish dinner with cannoli.

A favorite Dallas restaurant from the ‘80s, early ‘90s, and some of the 2010s makes like a cat with nine lives by coming back one more time. Bask in the red-light interiors (so ‘80s) but enjoy the chicken parmesan sans breadcrumbs — it’s made with a parmesan cheese crust (so now, and so gluten-free). Then there’s the sausage, caramelized onion, and roasted peppers pizza, made with sausage from Jimmy’s Italian. It’s also one of the few Italian spots in town to serve brunch, including its breakfast pizza from the ‘90s.

Jimmy's Food Store

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At this East Dallas legend, score sandwiches, wine, cream-filled cannoli, and more goodness straight from Italy. In addition to the prepared items, find a bounty of Italian groceries and a case packed with enough cured meats to satisfy any charcuterie junkie. Have a glass of wine while you shop.

Carbone Dallas

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Mario Carbone spent years trying to open an outpost in Dallas. Now that he has, it’s the reservation everyone is fighting to get, thanks to a high profile opening. When you do get in, and you will, all the classic red sauce options are available but there are some adventurous options also. Try the trio of prosciutto with freshly-made mozzarella, the ink squid ravioli with lobster both inside the pasta and in the sauce, and save room for the lemony cheesecake.

The Charles

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The Charles impresses diners with its modern, Italian-influenced dishes such as grilled halibut, ricotta gnudi with hazelnuts and brown butter honey, and a lush fennel-crusted pork blade chop.

Partenope Ristorante

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Partenope is an award-winning, Neapolitan pizza spot with handmade Italian pastas, craft cocktails and a beautiful interior, including pizza ovens plastered with hand-made tiles imported from Italy.

Chef David Uygur’s Bishop Arts restaurant has earned a loyal following of devoted diners since opening in 2010. It remains one of the city’s hardest tables to score, thanks to pitch-perfect charcuterie and more rustic Italian fare — and a terrifically intimate dining room. The menu changes frequently, and seeking guidance from the staff is recommended.

A table with peeling painted chairs sits in front of a bookcase full of old books, with walls and shelves painted teal.
A table at Lucia in Bishop Arts.
Emily Loving

Aventino's

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Open in Fort Worth since 1982, Aventino’s is a local legend. Make the drive to Cowtown for Italian fare that’s comforting without being heavy, such as foccacia mozzarella, shrimp scampi, and veal Florentine.

PaneVino Osteria

Tucked into an Addison strip mall, PaneVino Osteria is a welcome respite from the nearby glut of restaurant chains. In its unpretentious space, find excellent wines, scratch-made rigatoni in spicy pork ragu, and lobster fra diavolo over fettuccini.

View this post on Instagram

cute little wine haven.

A post shared by emily | 27 | dallas, tx. (@emilyblasik) on

Kenny's Italian Kitchen

Get the feel of Little Italy in Dallas. In addition to the ice cold Grey Goose vodka on tap, this Addison Italian eatery entices diners with delicious and reasonably-priced baked ziti, chicken marsala, linguini with clams, and more.

Roman Cucina

No-frills Italian fare is the name of the game at this North Dallas favorite, where a plate of chicken parmigiana is priced at than less than $15. Feeling like a little splurge? Consider the langostino a fuoco, or lobster in a spicy tomato-cream sauce.

Adelmo's Ristorante

For over 25 years and through two moves, Adelmo’s has been serving classic Italian food to in-the-know Dallasites. Nightly specials, a rotating wine list, and now in a location at Lovers Lane with a lovely patio — there is always a reason to come back.

Antipasti at Adelmo’s Ristaurante
via Adelmos.com

Campisi's

With all the new Italian spots opening up, don’t forget to revisit this Dallas dining icon that has been serving Italian fare since 1946. Hit the original location on Mockingbird Lane for cheese-topped garlic bread, shrimp scampi, and homemade ravioli in red sauce.

Taverna

Restaurateur Alberto Lombardi opened the first outpost of this now-chain risotteria in Dallas, where it’s remained a Knox-Henderson favorite ever since. Risotto is, of course, an excellent option here, get the bowl topped with burrata and crispy prosciutto. There’s also a long list of gluten-free options.

Terilli's

Part of Dallas’s dining landscape since 1985, Terilli’s was forced to relocate from its original home after a devastating 2010 fire. The restaurant rose from the ashes in 2012, and has since served its classic Caesar salad and shrimp scampi to hordes of adoring diners.

Nonna

The first restaurant of chef Julian Barsotti’s dining empire, Nonna has served some of Highland Park’s finest Italian fare since 2006. Stunning entrees like white clam pizza, tortellini di ricotta, and Gulf red snapper with roasted squash, chickpeas, and salsa verde.

Carbone's

A Dallas favorite since it opened, the original Carbone’s is the spot for freshly-made pasta tossed in Sunday gravy, veal parmigiana, and spaghetti with meatballs. Finish dinner with cannoli.

Sfuzzi

A favorite Dallas restaurant from the ‘80s, early ‘90s, and some of the 2010s makes like a cat with nine lives by coming back one more time. Bask in the red-light interiors (so ‘80s) but enjoy the chicken parmesan sans breadcrumbs — it’s made with a parmesan cheese crust (so now, and so gluten-free). Then there’s the sausage, caramelized onion, and roasted peppers pizza, made with sausage from Jimmy’s Italian. It’s also one of the few Italian spots in town to serve brunch, including its breakfast pizza from the ‘90s.

Jimmy's Food Store

At this East Dallas legend, score sandwiches, wine, cream-filled cannoli, and more goodness straight from Italy. In addition to the prepared items, find a bounty of Italian groceries and a case packed with enough cured meats to satisfy any charcuterie junkie. Have a glass of wine while you shop.

Carbone Dallas

Mario Carbone spent years trying to open an outpost in Dallas. Now that he has, it’s the reservation everyone is fighting to get, thanks to a high profile opening. When you do get in, and you will, all the classic red sauce options are available but there are some adventurous options also. Try the trio of prosciutto with freshly-made mozzarella, the ink squid ravioli with lobster both inside the pasta and in the sauce, and save room for the lemony cheesecake.

The Charles

The Charles impresses diners with its modern, Italian-influenced dishes such as grilled halibut, ricotta gnudi with hazelnuts and brown butter honey, and a lush fennel-crusted pork blade chop.

Partenope Ristorante

Partenope is an award-winning, Neapolitan pizza spot with handmade Italian pastas, craft cocktails and a beautiful interior, including pizza ovens plastered with hand-made tiles imported from Italy.

Lucia

Chef David Uygur’s Bishop Arts restaurant has earned a loyal following of devoted diners since opening in 2010. It remains one of the city’s hardest tables to score, thanks to pitch-perfect charcuterie and more rustic Italian fare — and a terrifically intimate dining room. The menu changes frequently, and seeking guidance from the staff is recommended.

A table with peeling painted chairs sits in front of a bookcase full of old books, with walls and shelves painted teal.
A table at Lucia in Bishop Arts.
Emily Loving

Related Maps

Aventino's

Open in Fort Worth since 1982, Aventino’s is a local legend. Make the drive to Cowtown for Italian fare that’s comforting without being heavy, such as foccacia mozzarella, shrimp scampi, and veal Florentine.

Related Maps