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Tatsu Dallas specializes in chef-forward service.
Tatsu

9 Stellar Sushi Restaurants Around Dallas

Where to find perfect maki rolls, super-fresh sashimi, and more stunning raw fish dishes

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Tatsu Dallas specializes in chef-forward service.
| Tatsu

Despite being landlocked, Dallas’s sushi game is strong. From casual destinations for creative maki rolls to temaki-style sushi and super-fresh sashimi, the city’s finest sushi restaurants don’t skimp on quality.

In search of impeccably fresh uni flown in this morning or looking to satisfy a craving for a deep-fried maki roll stuffed with spicy tuna? These restaurants boast some of the best sushi dishes in DFW, all made with the finest ingredients.

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Note: Restaurants on this map are listed geographically.
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Akira Back Dallas

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There’s a lot of flash on the menu at Michelin-star winner Akra Back, and that makes it one of the most fun sushi experiences in the Metroplex. In addition to trying the traditional sushi, don’t miss Back’s tuna pizza and the AB Tacos with tuna tar tar. If you’re unsure what to order, the mystery box is a fun experience. 

A plate of jeju domi with snapper, kimchee, garlic, sesame, and vinegar at Akra Back Dallas.
The jeju domi appetizer at Akra Back Dallas.
Akra Back Dallas

Sushi Kadan

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A Carrollton strip mall hides this hidden gem destination for inexpensive, fresh fish. The chopped bay scallop rolls never disappoint. The restaurant is beautiful on the inside, which is no surprise since Kadan means “flower bed” in Japanese.

Mr. Sushi

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Since 1984, Mr. Sushi has been serving excellent sushi rolls, banging on its big gong, and singing a unique rendition of the Happy Birthday song night after night in Addison. A fan favorite is the restaurant’s Green Mussel Dynamite: green mussels tossed in a spicy sauce, then baked and served in the shell with a squeeze of lemon.

Edoko Omakase

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One of the greats is just sitting there in an Irving strip mall. Head in for a serving of sushi with a side of Texas. Chef Keunsik Lee has worked at the Nobu group, which is renowned for its excellent sushi, and Lee’s clever incorporation of tacos and tostadas will make even sushi-adverse Texans feel right at home.

Small seatings and exclusivity seem to be the latest trend in Dallas sushi. Shoyo, which is tucked away on Lowest Greenville, offers just that. It offers a tasting menu only at $175 per person — and with a limited 12-person seating, it’s not easy to get in. The meal itself changes based on availability, seasonality, and the whims of a crew of Nobu-trained chefs. 

A bite of octopus sits under a bed of rice.
A bite from Shoyo’s tasting menu.
a sea of love

Sasa Sushi

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Lakewood’s favorite Sasa Sushi is always packed with East Dallasites enjoying date night. For lunch and dinner, choose from a solid selection of creative sushi rolls, and add an order of the edamame ricotta dumplings with truffle oil.

Yutaka Sushi Bistro

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This chic Uptown sushi bar is a favorite among neighborhood regulars, thanks to its always-fresh fish and creative preparations. The small dining room appeals to date night diners enjoying sushi, sashimi, and high-quality rolls.

This Austin export, known for its inventive dishes and seriously quality fish, has become a beloved part of Dallas’s sushi scene. The happy hour here is notoriously good, with foie gras and hamachi nigiri priced under $10. For those who arrive during dinner, the chef tastings, both vegetarian and omnivore-friendly, are worth a splurge. 

A hand holds up a board with several cuts of sushi on it.
A sideboard of sushi at Uchi.
Uchi Dallas

Tatsu Dallas

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Tatsu Dallas is among the city’s most challenging to get reservations at the moment. This 10-seat omakase sushi spot in Deep Ellum has only two daily seatings. Sushi chef Tatsuya Sekiguchi serves edomae-style sushi, a technique from the time before refrigeration existed, with a focus on using sustainable fish.

Between a blue door with the words “Tastu Dallas” and a gold design, and a wooden wall, peeks out a glimpse into a small dining room where sushi is served.
A glimpse into Tatsu’s ultra-exclusive space.
Tatsu

Akira Back Dallas

A plate of jeju domi with snapper, kimchee, garlic, sesame, and vinegar at Akra Back Dallas.
The jeju domi appetizer at Akra Back Dallas.
Akra Back Dallas

There’s a lot of flash on the menu at Michelin-star winner Akra Back, and that makes it one of the most fun sushi experiences in the Metroplex. In addition to trying the traditional sushi, don’t miss Back’s tuna pizza and the AB Tacos with tuna tar tar. If you’re unsure what to order, the mystery box is a fun experience. 

A plate of jeju domi with snapper, kimchee, garlic, sesame, and vinegar at Akra Back Dallas.
The jeju domi appetizer at Akra Back Dallas.
Akra Back Dallas

Sushi Kadan

A Carrollton strip mall hides this hidden gem destination for inexpensive, fresh fish. The chopped bay scallop rolls never disappoint. The restaurant is beautiful on the inside, which is no surprise since Kadan means “flower bed” in Japanese.

Mr. Sushi

Since 1984, Mr. Sushi has been serving excellent sushi rolls, banging on its big gong, and singing a unique rendition of the Happy Birthday song night after night in Addison. A fan favorite is the restaurant’s Green Mussel Dynamite: green mussels tossed in a spicy sauce, then baked and served in the shell with a squeeze of lemon.

Edoko Omakase

One of the greats is just sitting there in an Irving strip mall. Head in for a serving of sushi with a side of Texas. Chef Keunsik Lee has worked at the Nobu group, which is renowned for its excellent sushi, and Lee’s clever incorporation of tacos and tostadas will make even sushi-adverse Texans feel right at home.

Shoyo

A bite of octopus sits under a bed of rice.
A bite from Shoyo’s tasting menu.
a sea of love

Small seatings and exclusivity seem to be the latest trend in Dallas sushi. Shoyo, which is tucked away on Lowest Greenville, offers just that. It offers a tasting menu only at $175 per person — and with a limited 12-person seating, it’s not easy to get in. The meal itself changes based on availability, seasonality, and the whims of a crew of Nobu-trained chefs. 

A bite of octopus sits under a bed of rice.
A bite from Shoyo’s tasting menu.
a sea of love

Sasa Sushi

Lakewood’s favorite Sasa Sushi is always packed with East Dallasites enjoying date night. For lunch and dinner, choose from a solid selection of creative sushi rolls, and add an order of the edamame ricotta dumplings with truffle oil.

Yutaka Sushi Bistro

This chic Uptown sushi bar is a favorite among neighborhood regulars, thanks to its always-fresh fish and creative preparations. The small dining room appeals to date night diners enjoying sushi, sashimi, and high-quality rolls.

Uchi

A hand holds up a board with several cuts of sushi on it.
A sideboard of sushi at Uchi.
Uchi Dallas

This Austin export, known for its inventive dishes and seriously quality fish, has become a beloved part of Dallas’s sushi scene. The happy hour here is notoriously good, with foie gras and hamachi nigiri priced under $10. For those who arrive during dinner, the chef tastings, both vegetarian and omnivore-friendly, are worth a splurge. 

A hand holds up a board with several cuts of sushi on it.
A sideboard of sushi at Uchi.
Uchi Dallas

Tatsu Dallas

Between a blue door with the words “Tastu Dallas” and a gold design, and a wooden wall, peeks out a glimpse into a small dining room where sushi is served.
A glimpse into Tatsu’s ultra-exclusive space.
Tatsu

Tatsu Dallas is among the city’s most challenging to get reservations at the moment. This 10-seat omakase sushi spot in Deep Ellum has only two daily seatings. Sushi chef Tatsuya Sekiguchi serves edomae-style sushi, a technique from the time before refrigeration existed, with a focus on using sustainable fish.

Between a blue door with the words “Tastu Dallas” and a gold design, and a wooden wall, peeks out a glimpse into a small dining room where sushi is served.
A glimpse into Tatsu’s ultra-exclusive space.
Tatsu

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