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A woman’s arms hold a bread board with vegetable focaccia as she sets it on a table with a full place setting.
The house-made focaccia at Written by the Seasons changes seasonally.
Kathy Tran

13 Essential Restaurants in Bishop Arts

Where to dine as the hipsters do in Dallas

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The house-made focaccia at Written by the Seasons changes seasonally.
| Kathy Tran

After years of explosive growth, Bishop Arts has settled into being of Dallas’ most distinct dining neighborhoods. This neighborhood has a small-town vibe, despite being just 10 minutes away from Downtown, and boasts a ton of culinary goodness.

Home to Lucia, arguably the city’s most revered eatery, and authentic Hill Country barbecue, this tiny area near West Davis and Bishop Avenue is packed with diverse food options. Let this map of the best restaurants in Bishop Arts be your guide to the area’s best spots for lunch, brunch, and dinner.

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Lockhart Smokehouse

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Home to some of the city’s best barbecue, Lockhart Smokehouse brings a Hill Country pedigree. Owner Jill Grobowsky Bergus’ grandfather helmed the iconic Kreuz Market in until the 1980s, and it’s still in the family. With no need to improve on a classic, this spot has its sausages shipped in fresh from Lockhart.

Krio Bishop Arts

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In this light, airy spot, order up a plate of Asian-inspired Cajun food, dubbed by Krio as “Far East meets the Deep South.” This is not a combination easily found anywhere else in the Metroplex, so this might be one of the best spots to try crawfish bisque and Jambalaya eggrolls. Bonus, Krio is offering industry prices on Monday nights with deals from 4 p.m. until the kitchen closes.

Âme has big shoes to fill, sliding into the spot once occupied by the longtime local favorite, Hattie’s. They’ve kept the atmosphere fancy enough to be an excellent big night out spot, but the menu combines Indian- and French-inspired plates. The presentation veers French while the food offers twists on traditional Indian dishes. And everything, from top to bottom, is an Instagram moment.

Zen Sushi in the Bishop Arts

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Chef Michelle Carpenter creates Omakase-style sushi, with hints of Texas and Creole influence. It was the neighborhood’s first sushi spots and is now one of its long-standing fixtures. Order from the originals side of the menu — the Xalapa roll and the Zen Bruchetta are recommended.

Coco’s Fire & Ice

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It’s all too easy to miss Coco’s, tucked behind shops selling soap and tchotchkes. But venturing back here is well worth your time. Find three small dining areas, including a porch, where Mexican rock music is the soundtrack for a meal featuring Dallas’s best mole sauce—it’s got a real kick of spice. Coco’s is also known for its paloma off the cocktail list, which is served in a terracotta mug.

Eno's Pizza Tavern

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Eno’s created such a loyal following for its cracker-thin-crust pizzas over its 10 years in Bishop Arts, it added multiple locations. Diners of the original will find a sizable selection of beers on tap plus a smaller but well-curated wine list. Pro tip: go lighter on the toppings to ensure the pizza crust stays ultra crisp.

Boulevardier

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Dallas doesn’t feel much like Paris, unless you happen to be on the patio at Boulevardier. Pair the locally-inspired bistro fare (think duck leg confit and crawfish beignets) with a bottle of something fancy, yet affordable, from the restaurant’s expertly-curated wine list.

Taco Y Vino

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It’s tough to beat the chill atmosphere at this spot on the outskirts of Bishop Arts. If the weather is right, grab a patio seat and indulge in the house special: a bottle of wine and six tacos for $40.

Reservations at Lucia go quickly — sometimes months in advance, and for good reason. Chef David Uygur’s pasta, charcuterie, and inventive Italian dishes have been praised by every critic and diner in the city. Pro-tip: Go alone and score a spot at Lucia’s counter, which offers open seating.

Sketches of Spain

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Want to feel pampered and get away from the bustle of the main strip on Bishop Street? This is the place. The hospitality and atmosphere at this location are head and shoulders above most of the rest of the neighborhood. Go wild ordering from the tapas menu, and the Spanish ham croquettes are a cheese-filled delight.

Paradiso

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To truly be where the hipsters are in Bishop Arts, Paradiso is stop number one. The Mediterranean menu offers a trip all the way around Southern Europe, while the millennial pink decor, prolific greenery, and booming music make a strong statement about who is Paradiso’s core customer demographic.

Written by the Seasons

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There is scarcely a better spot for people-watching in the neighborhood than the tables positioned in front of the sliding door that spans the entire length of this restaurant. Grab one of these star tables at Written by the Seasons and experience indoor/outdoor life like a Californian. The menu changes seasonally, but the fresh-baked sourdough bread or seasonal cheese board are always a delight. If it’s Tuesday through Saturday from 3 to 6 p.m., order up a half-price bottle of wine.

Casablanca

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The team behind Paradiso opened this Moroccan-influenced location a block away that offers a much more intimate bar heavily inspired by the look and feel of Casablanca, the movie. Around back, find its sibling karaoke bar, Casanova. There’s a great value in ordering from the noodle selections for bar food, but the pork and plum dumplings are the perfect combination of sweet and savory.

Lockhart Smokehouse

Home to some of the city’s best barbecue, Lockhart Smokehouse brings a Hill Country pedigree. Owner Jill Grobowsky Bergus’ grandfather helmed the iconic Kreuz Market in until the 1980s, and it’s still in the family. With no need to improve on a classic, this spot has its sausages shipped in fresh from Lockhart.

Krio Bishop Arts

In this light, airy spot, order up a plate of Asian-inspired Cajun food, dubbed by Krio as “Far East meets the Deep South.” This is not a combination easily found anywhere else in the Metroplex, so this might be one of the best spots to try crawfish bisque and Jambalaya eggrolls. Bonus, Krio is offering industry prices on Monday nights with deals from 4 p.m. until the kitchen closes.

Ame

Âme has big shoes to fill, sliding into the spot once occupied by the longtime local favorite, Hattie’s. They’ve kept the atmosphere fancy enough to be an excellent big night out spot, but the menu combines Indian- and French-inspired plates. The presentation veers French while the food offers twists on traditional Indian dishes. And everything, from top to bottom, is an Instagram moment.

Zen Sushi in the Bishop Arts

Chef Michelle Carpenter creates Omakase-style sushi, with hints of Texas and Creole influence. It was the neighborhood’s first sushi spots and is now one of its long-standing fixtures. Order from the originals side of the menu — the Xalapa roll and the Zen Bruchetta are recommended.

Coco’s Fire & Ice

It’s all too easy to miss Coco’s, tucked behind shops selling soap and tchotchkes. But venturing back here is well worth your time. Find three small dining areas, including a porch, where Mexican rock music is the soundtrack for a meal featuring Dallas’s best mole sauce—it’s got a real kick of spice. Coco’s is also known for its paloma off the cocktail list, which is served in a terracotta mug.

Eno's Pizza Tavern

Eno’s created such a loyal following for its cracker-thin-crust pizzas over its 10 years in Bishop Arts, it added multiple locations. Diners of the original will find a sizable selection of beers on tap plus a smaller but well-curated wine list. Pro tip: go lighter on the toppings to ensure the pizza crust stays ultra crisp.

Boulevardier

Dallas doesn’t feel much like Paris, unless you happen to be on the patio at Boulevardier. Pair the locally-inspired bistro fare (think duck leg confit and crawfish beignets) with a bottle of something fancy, yet affordable, from the restaurant’s expertly-curated wine list.

Taco Y Vino

It’s tough to beat the chill atmosphere at this spot on the outskirts of Bishop Arts. If the weather is right, grab a patio seat and indulge in the house special: a bottle of wine and six tacos for $40.

Lucia

Reservations at Lucia go quickly — sometimes months in advance, and for good reason. Chef David Uygur’s pasta, charcuterie, and inventive Italian dishes have been praised by every critic and diner in the city. Pro-tip: Go alone and score a spot at Lucia’s counter, which offers open seating.

Sketches of Spain

Want to feel pampered and get away from the bustle of the main strip on Bishop Street? This is the place. The hospitality and atmosphere at this location are head and shoulders above most of the rest of the neighborhood. Go wild ordering from the tapas menu, and the Spanish ham croquettes are a cheese-filled delight.

Paradiso

To truly be where the hipsters are in Bishop Arts, Paradiso is stop number one. The Mediterranean menu offers a trip all the way around Southern Europe, while the millennial pink decor, prolific greenery, and booming music make a strong statement about who is Paradiso’s core customer demographic.

Written by the Seasons

There is scarcely a better spot for people-watching in the neighborhood than the tables positioned in front of the sliding door that spans the entire length of this restaurant. Grab one of these star tables at Written by the Seasons and experience indoor/outdoor life like a Californian. The menu changes seasonally, but the fresh-baked sourdough bread or seasonal cheese board are always a delight. If it’s Tuesday through Saturday from 3 to 6 p.m., order up a half-price bottle of wine.

Casablanca

The team behind Paradiso opened this Moroccan-influenced location a block away that offers a much more intimate bar heavily inspired by the look and feel of Casablanca, the movie. Around back, find its sibling karaoke bar, Casanova. There’s a great value in ordering from the noodle selections for bar food, but the pork and plum dumplings are the perfect combination of sweet and savory.

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