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A tomahawk steak sits on a cutting board, surrounded by sides in silver dishes and glasses of wine.
Head to the Saint for one hell of a steak.
The Saint

14 Essential Dallas Steakhouses

Where to find this meat-obsessed city’s finest cuts

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Head to the Saint for one hell of a steak.
| The Saint

It used to be that Dallas was known only as a land of steakhouses, but the city’s reputation has changed in recent years. Still, the steakhouse is a fixture of Dallas’ dining scene, largely because no one can deny the appeal of a perfectly-grilled hunk of USDA prime beef.

Ranging from Chef John Tesar’s modern take on steak to longstanding institutions dedicated to the classic steakhouse vibe, these restaurants serve Dallas’s best steaks. Go forth, and live your meat-obsessed dreams.

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Chamberlain’s Steak & Chop House

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Chef Richard Chamberlain opened his eponymous restaurant in 1993. Typical steakhouse fare, including a wedge salad and shrimp and lobster bisque, join less traditional dishes such as a Kona coffee glazed New York strip and pomegranate glazed duck breast. It is one of the rare steakhouses that offers a gluten-free menu. 

Al Biernat's North

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Al Biernat’s has been serving Dallas steak steak steak steak steak for 25 years, which speaks loudly. It’s one of the few open for brunch, lunch, and dinner. It’s got multiple cuts of steak even more seafood options, and is also one of the few with a vegan section of the menu. And it may just have the most extensive list of sides in the city’s steakhouse oeuvre. In North Dallas and Oak Lawn, there’s something for everyone at this chophouse. 

Knife Dallas

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Chef John Tesar’s meat temple at The Highland has racked up accolades and inspired a cookbook. The steaks here are aged in a special $50,000 dry aging chamber for up to 240 days, adding an intense funk and richness. Knife’s “new-school” cuts like skirt steak flat iron are just as good as the pricier hunks of beef on offer for those balling on a budget. 

Mister Charles

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There’s a controversial argument that serving a select few of the highest quality cuts of steak in a refined dining environment that isn’t a steakhouse is the future of steakhouses. It’s undoubtedly the most sustainable way to run one, at any rate. While the owners of this spot would prefer not to call it a steakhouse, the fact remains that the right side of its menu contains a trio of terribly expensive and outstanding cuts of beef that true steak connoisseurs will want to try. And on the right side, for those not inclined to commit to the high prices, are smaller bites that incorporate that same high-quality beef in its A5 striploin on brioche canape and the beef carpaccio. 

SĒR Steak + Spirits

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Atop the Hilton Anatole sits a steakhouse with an amazing view of Dallas. The steak options range from six- to a whopping 38-ounces (obviously, that’s a tomahawk, and its also served with foie gras and multiple sauces — for sharing). Also notable on this menu is the rack of elk and its chicken karaage. 

Nick & Sam's

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A favorite of old-money types and celebrities alike, it’s common to see a few Cowboys or other local celebs in this Uptown dining room. The steaks here are solid, the service is attentive, and it’s swanky enough to impress even the finickiest diners.

Stillwell's

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This swanky steakhouse in the Hotel Swexan is dark and sexy. It serves beef that comes entirely from the proprietary Harwood Beef program. Don’t skip the celery root pave in the sides section, an accompaniment unique to this spot — you won’t find anything quite like it elsewhere in town.

Town Hearth

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It’s no secret that Chef Nick Badovinus knows his way around beef, and this Design District spot is as splashy and flashy (and steak-devoted) as they come. Under the glow of chandeliers, dig into hearth-grilled beef that’s worth the pretty penny it costs.

The Saint

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Pull into this Deep Ellum-adjacent steakhouse (with free parking btw) for a romantic vibe. It’s dark and moody in here and the bar is great for people watching. The steak menu, helmed by former Wolfgang Punk Five Sixty chef Jacob Williamson, runs deep with beef sourced from Texas. Wagyu is the main feature, and it offers a Texas tomahawk Tuesday special for $195 that covers two diners and includes a 36 oz wagyu ribeye with all the fixings.

Corrientes 348 Argentinian Steakhouse

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Wood-grilled steaks, fish, and vegetables are served family-style inside this Downtown Argentinian steakhouse. Start with an order or two of the restaurant’s famous empanadas served with chimichurri sauce and a big salad, and enjoy your favorite cut of meat, sliced and served tableside.  

Dakota's

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This Dallas institution reopened in 2021 and is probably best known for its atmosphere — a subterranean garden complete with a fire pit sand 20-foot water wall. However, it also delivers classic steakhouse fare, including several cuts of meat aged by Allen Brothers and sides like oysters Rockefeller, wedge salad, and loaded mashed potatoes.

Brass Ram

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Nick Badovinus expanded his empire with the opening of Brass Ram on the outskirts of Downtown. It’s got his signature style, with mounted motorcycles and a private dining room loaded with Marilyn Monroe portraits. It’s also got steaks, lots and lots of steaks. He wanted to build an old-school steakhouse, and so he did. Go for the prime rib, New York strip, and porterhouse, among other cuts.

Y.O. Ranch Steakhouse

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Don’t let visiting tourists have all the fun; Y.O. Steakhouse in Dallas’ West End is a classic Texas-style steakhouse without the fussiness of the bigger, more opulent spots in town. Chef and owner Tony Street uses products from local farms, ranches, and artisans to cook traditional steakhouse fare like prime beef cuts, wild game, and the yummy gouda mac and cheese from Street’s Fine Chicken.

Crown Block

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Now open in Reunion Tower, the steakhouse serves locally sourced steaks from tomahawks to New York prime strips, along with every kind of sushi and seafood a Texan’s heart could desire. Enjoy it with a side dish of the best views of Dallas. 

Chamberlain’s Steak & Chop House

Chef Richard Chamberlain opened his eponymous restaurant in 1993. Typical steakhouse fare, including a wedge salad and shrimp and lobster bisque, join less traditional dishes such as a Kona coffee glazed New York strip and pomegranate glazed duck breast. It is one of the rare steakhouses that offers a gluten-free menu. 

Al Biernat's North

Al Biernat’s has been serving Dallas steak steak steak steak steak for 25 years, which speaks loudly. It’s one of the few open for brunch, lunch, and dinner. It’s got multiple cuts of steak even more seafood options, and is also one of the few with a vegan section of the menu. And it may just have the most extensive list of sides in the city’s steakhouse oeuvre. In North Dallas and Oak Lawn, there’s something for everyone at this chophouse. 

Knife Dallas

Chef John Tesar’s meat temple at The Highland has racked up accolades and inspired a cookbook. The steaks here are aged in a special $50,000 dry aging chamber for up to 240 days, adding an intense funk and richness. Knife’s “new-school” cuts like skirt steak flat iron are just as good as the pricier hunks of beef on offer for those balling on a budget. 

Mister Charles

There’s a controversial argument that serving a select few of the highest quality cuts of steak in a refined dining environment that isn’t a steakhouse is the future of steakhouses. It’s undoubtedly the most sustainable way to run one, at any rate. While the owners of this spot would prefer not to call it a steakhouse, the fact remains that the right side of its menu contains a trio of terribly expensive and outstanding cuts of beef that true steak connoisseurs will want to try. And on the right side, for those not inclined to commit to the high prices, are smaller bites that incorporate that same high-quality beef in its A5 striploin on brioche canape and the beef carpaccio. 

SĒR Steak + Spirits

Atop the Hilton Anatole sits a steakhouse with an amazing view of Dallas. The steak options range from six- to a whopping 38-ounces (obviously, that’s a tomahawk, and its also served with foie gras and multiple sauces — for sharing). Also notable on this menu is the rack of elk and its chicken karaage. 

Nick & Sam's

A favorite of old-money types and celebrities alike, it’s common to see a few Cowboys or other local celebs in this Uptown dining room. The steaks here are solid, the service is attentive, and it’s swanky enough to impress even the finickiest diners.

Stillwell's

This swanky steakhouse in the Hotel Swexan is dark and sexy. It serves beef that comes entirely from the proprietary Harwood Beef program. Don’t skip the celery root pave in the sides section, an accompaniment unique to this spot — you won’t find anything quite like it elsewhere in town.

Town Hearth

It’s no secret that Chef Nick Badovinus knows his way around beef, and this Design District spot is as splashy and flashy (and steak-devoted) as they come. Under the glow of chandeliers, dig into hearth-grilled beef that’s worth the pretty penny it costs.

The Saint

Pull into this Deep Ellum-adjacent steakhouse (with free parking btw) for a romantic vibe. It’s dark and moody in here and the bar is great for people watching. The steak menu, helmed by former Wolfgang Punk Five Sixty chef Jacob Williamson, runs deep with beef sourced from Texas. Wagyu is the main feature, and it offers a Texas tomahawk Tuesday special for $195 that covers two diners and includes a 36 oz wagyu ribeye with all the fixings.

Corrientes 348 Argentinian Steakhouse

Wood-grilled steaks, fish, and vegetables are served family-style inside this Downtown Argentinian steakhouse. Start with an order or two of the restaurant’s famous empanadas served with chimichurri sauce and a big salad, and enjoy your favorite cut of meat, sliced and served tableside.  

Dakota's

This Dallas institution reopened in 2021 and is probably best known for its atmosphere — a subterranean garden complete with a fire pit sand 20-foot water wall. However, it also delivers classic steakhouse fare, including several cuts of meat aged by Allen Brothers and sides like oysters Rockefeller, wedge salad, and loaded mashed potatoes.

Brass Ram

Nick Badovinus expanded his empire with the opening of Brass Ram on the outskirts of Downtown. It’s got his signature style, with mounted motorcycles and a private dining room loaded with Marilyn Monroe portraits. It’s also got steaks, lots and lots of steaks. He wanted to build an old-school steakhouse, and so he did. Go for the prime rib, New York strip, and porterhouse, among other cuts.

Y.O. Ranch Steakhouse

Don’t let visiting tourists have all the fun; Y.O. Steakhouse in Dallas’ West End is a classic Texas-style steakhouse without the fussiness of the bigger, more opulent spots in town. Chef and owner Tony Street uses products from local farms, ranches, and artisans to cook traditional steakhouse fare like prime beef cuts, wild game, and the yummy gouda mac and cheese from Street’s Fine Chicken.

Crown Block

Now open in Reunion Tower, the steakhouse serves locally sourced steaks from tomahawks to New York prime strips, along with every kind of sushi and seafood a Texan’s heart could desire. Enjoy it with a side dish of the best views of Dallas. 

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