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A pair of mens hands grab items from a plate of baked oysters. The white plate they’re on sits on a red-stained patio table.
Oysters Beatrice at Restaurant Beatrice in Oak Cliff.
Kathy Tran

9 Marvelous Cajun and Creole Restaurants in Dallas

Laissez le bon temps rouler!

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Oysters Beatrice at Restaurant Beatrice in Oak Cliff.
| Kathy Tran

With Louisiana just a short car ride away, Cajun and Creole cooking are well-loved in Dallas. When the urge strikes for a great bowl of gumbo, an excellent etouffee, or a dozen grilled oysters, Dallasites don’t have to drive to Shreveport or points beyond. There are excellent options right here.

These are the best restaurants for Cajun and Creole cooking in Big D.

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Eater maps are curated by editors and aim to reflect a diversity of neighborhoods, cuisines, and prices. Learn more about our editorial process.

Shell Shack

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This local chain is a great stop for Cajun bites — it’s got all the classic plus unique inventions to it including crab stuffed tater tots, Mardi Gras pasta, and alligator tendies. It’s also the spot for by the pound boils of multiple varieties of crab, crawfish, mussels, and shrimp.

Granny's Cajun Cooking

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Got baskets on the brain? Head to Granny’s for catfish, pork chops, shrimp, turkey legs, and wing baskets, excellent po’ boys, and boudin balls. Don’t miss adding the Cajun fried cauliflower on the side.

Aw Shucks

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This no-frills oyster bar specializes in beachfront food, including a lot of Cajun and Creole favorites such as crab bites, shrimp and sausage gumbo, boiled seafoods with a choice of seasonings, po’ boys, blackened fish, and fried catfish.

Dodie's

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For more of a family-friendly scene (er, except on the major drinking holidays when it becomes a full on party), head to this Greenville Ave. spot. Happy hour lasts from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday through Friday, and the regular menu has local favorites including blackened seafood nachos, Natchitoches spicy meat pies, Cajun tamales (lump crab cake stuffed jalapeno served fried or grilled), and an array of gumbos.

S & D Oyster Company

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Head to this longstanding restaurant for Creole food, with a heavy eye towards seafood — oysters specifically, obviously. Other than a dozen raw or grilled oysters, try ordering the oyster loaf sandwich, New Orleans barbecue shrimp, or a bowl of the seafood gumbo.

The Free Man

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With Cajun food and live music daily, this is perhaps the most New Orleans Frenchman Street-style restaurant in Dallas. Aside from hearing the tunes, stop in to enjoy plates of Cajun crawfish pasta, The Ella (pasta with lemon caper cream sauce served with blackened chicken, catfish, or shrimp), or a po’ boy made with shrimp, catfish, oysters, chicken, alligator, or spinach.

Ragin Casian

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Try a fusion of Cajun and Asian food here. Think boudin egg rolls, spicy noodle gumbo (served pho-style), and Cajun fried rice. For an extra touch of New Orleans authenticity, this place orders several products directly from Louisiana, including Patton’s hot sausage, Cafe du Monde coffee, and seafood from the Gulf.

Aunt Irene's Kitchen

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This place is a longtime local favorite. Try the famous Black Box — there are many iterations of this dish, most including some combination of a low-country boil: crab clusters, shrimp, sausage, corn, and potatoes. It also serves an array of boxes of fried and grilled Cajun favorites ranging from fish and shrimp to wings and sausage.

Restaurant Beatrice

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This James Beard-nominated restaurant is one of the city’s leaders in sustainable practices — and serves incredible food. Modern takes on classic Cajun and Creole dishes are available, including shrimp and grits, dark meat fried chicken, and a gumbo z’herbes inspired by the legendary Leah Chase. The Louisiana charcuterie board is a must-try. And in the spring and summer, it holds seafood boils on the patio.

Shell Shack

This local chain is a great stop for Cajun bites — it’s got all the classic plus unique inventions to it including crab stuffed tater tots, Mardi Gras pasta, and alligator tendies. It’s also the spot for by the pound boils of multiple varieties of crab, crawfish, mussels, and shrimp.

Granny's Cajun Cooking

Got baskets on the brain? Head to Granny’s for catfish, pork chops, shrimp, turkey legs, and wing baskets, excellent po’ boys, and boudin balls. Don’t miss adding the Cajun fried cauliflower on the side.

Aw Shucks

This no-frills oyster bar specializes in beachfront food, including a lot of Cajun and Creole favorites such as crab bites, shrimp and sausage gumbo, boiled seafoods with a choice of seasonings, po’ boys, blackened fish, and fried catfish.

Dodie's

For more of a family-friendly scene (er, except on the major drinking holidays when it becomes a full on party), head to this Greenville Ave. spot. Happy hour lasts from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday through Friday, and the regular menu has local favorites including blackened seafood nachos, Natchitoches spicy meat pies, Cajun tamales (lump crab cake stuffed jalapeno served fried or grilled), and an array of gumbos.

S & D Oyster Company

Head to this longstanding restaurant for Creole food, with a heavy eye towards seafood — oysters specifically, obviously. Other than a dozen raw or grilled oysters, try ordering the oyster loaf sandwich, New Orleans barbecue shrimp, or a bowl of the seafood gumbo.

The Free Man

With Cajun food and live music daily, this is perhaps the most New Orleans Frenchman Street-style restaurant in Dallas. Aside from hearing the tunes, stop in to enjoy plates of Cajun crawfish pasta, The Ella (pasta with lemon caper cream sauce served with blackened chicken, catfish, or shrimp), or a po’ boy made with shrimp, catfish, oysters, chicken, alligator, or spinach.

Ragin Casian

Try a fusion of Cajun and Asian food here. Think boudin egg rolls, spicy noodle gumbo (served pho-style), and Cajun fried rice. For an extra touch of New Orleans authenticity, this place orders several products directly from Louisiana, including Patton’s hot sausage, Cafe du Monde coffee, and seafood from the Gulf.

Aunt Irene's Kitchen

This place is a longtime local favorite. Try the famous Black Box — there are many iterations of this dish, most including some combination of a low-country boil: crab clusters, shrimp, sausage, corn, and potatoes. It also serves an array of boxes of fried and grilled Cajun favorites ranging from fish and shrimp to wings and sausage.

Restaurant Beatrice

This James Beard-nominated restaurant is one of the city’s leaders in sustainable practices — and serves incredible food. Modern takes on classic Cajun and Creole dishes are available, including shrimp and grits, dark meat fried chicken, and a gumbo z’herbes inspired by the legendary Leah Chase. The Louisiana charcuterie board is a must-try. And in the spring and summer, it holds seafood boils on the patio.

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